Category Archives: Address Procedure

A Look At Rickie Fowler’s Golf Swing

I looked at Rickie Fowler’s golf swing a while back and declared that he was making some progress from the swing with which he had turned pro and then with which he encountered some back injury issues.

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Hips & Legs + Stable Head = Awesome Leverage

For those of you looking for that awesome leverage demonstrated by the likes of Jack Nicklaus in his heyday, I have good news for you.

It can be naturally produced with the simple equation I’ve given you in the post title.

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Re: The Old “Moving Off The Ball”

Before I begin: Thanks to everyone who has reserved their copy of the upcoming eBook “The MCS Golf Swing,” your support is much appreciated!  The Advance Order window with the 25% discount from the release price will be open for another week or so before it closes.

Now, on to the title subject.

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Tiger Woods’ Hop-Skip & Jump

If you remember your old track & field terminology, the “Triple Jump” used to be known more informally as the “Hop, Skip & Jump.”

Perhaps I’m dating myself, but that’s what I was watching today when I tuned into the Hero World Challenge to see how Tiger Woods’ swing looked.

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Sean Foley Suddenly Discovers Proper Spine Position

I got a tip from targettom about some musings on the swing from Sean Foley on the Golf Channel, and other than the fact that he seems to have suddenly discovered proper spine position at address, I have to say that most of what he was saying was  a mish-mash of modern swing gobbledygook.

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Jon Rahm Calls Jack Nicklaus, Tiger Woods & Others “Weekend Players”

This is great – how many times have analysts used Modern Golf Swing principles to critique the greatest players in golf’s long history?

Now we have Jon Rahm (although he likely didn’t write the piece with his name on it) calling Jack Nicklaus, Sam Snead, and Tiger Woods (among others) nothing short of “weekend players.”

Not directly, but then again, that’s what happens when you either let others do your writing for you, or when you don’t really know what you’re talking about – take your pick.

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Can You See The Swing Point Here?

I wish all of Wax Nation in the U.S. a safe weekend, and I know some of you are in Texas – first, I hope you’re not anywhere near the flooding and hurricane/tropical storm damage and if you are, stay secure!

It is counter-intuitive to think, if you’re not used to the concept, that you swing from something other than your arms, but that is reality.

The arms are the only links to the club, of course, but they arms are swinging from the shoulders, and the mid-point of the shoulders is really the point around which the swing turns.

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There Are Some Things Many People Get Wrong

The easiest part of striking a golf ball is in the fact that it isn’t moving – it is a stationary object, and you are never going to strike or stroke a ball that is in motion.

So, what is the most difficult part of striking a golf ball?

It’s the same fact – the ball is not in motion, rather it is sitting there quite placidly, awaiting your stroke at it.

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My “Most Important” Part Of The Back Swing – Part I

I’ve spent some time talking about the down swing with regards to the “Drop & Pop,” so I thought perhaps I’d go backwards from there to the most important part of the back swing pivot, which is the initial move.

Just as the tendency for something to go wrong in the down swing is the initial move, the “Drop” part of the “Drop & Pop,” the most crucial part of the back swing pivot and the “One Major Move” is the first part.

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What Happened To Jason Day? Alignment?

I noticed something when the wheels came off Jason Day’s cart, and because I was watching live and couldn’t record the round, I had to wait for the video later to see if I’d actually seen what I thought I saw.

I am pretty sure that I got it right, although I initially thought that Day was standing with a closed stance to his target line, which for someone who stands square to the line for the most part, would cause either a right push or a pull hook depending on how you come into the ball (from the inside or over the top).

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