Tag Archives: Jack Nicklaus

Staying “Behind” The Ball Rather Than “Moving Behind” It

There’s a reason for every single thing that is in the MCS Golf Swing model theory.

You’ll hear a lot of talk in certain circles about the need to “move behind the ball” on the back swing pivot, but that is only because the swinger is not where they need to be at impact when they begin that pivot.

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I Play A Fade Jack Nicklaus-Style – What Does The GC Quad Show?

When it comes to shot-shaping, you all know I’ve always been highly critical of the concept of “swinging left,” for several reasons.

First, because it’s hard on the lower back – all of your force is going out and to the right (for a right-hander) and you’re trying to yank the club left through impact.

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I Brought Up “Big Legs, Little Arms” Before The New Year…

It was back in December, and ironically, it was about how Mike Dunaway produced so much leverage with such a “short” back swing.

The “short” part meant of course that his back swing didn’t produce a club shaft way past parallel or even pointing at the ground the way long drivers have.

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Look At Jack Real-Time & Demo At Address

If you are still fighting the feel of the optimal and mechanically-correct address stance, you really need to look at the address stance of the greatest major champion of all time (and 3rd all time in total Tour wins), one Jack Nicklaus.

I have spoken before as well that you should be careful when looking at Jack’s swing because, likely due to the fact that he spent so little time practicing and playing (he did bear, after the nickname of “Legend In His Spare Time” and the reason for the post thumbnail above), he got away from his most solid fundamentals from time to time before getting back to basics.

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Hips & Legs + Stable Head = Awesome Leverage

For those of you looking for that awesome leverage demonstrated by the likes of Jack Nicklaus in his heyday, I have good news for you.

It can be naturally produced with the simple equation I’ve given you in the post title.

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Golf Legend Mickey Wright Condemns The Modern Swing

This is incredible – I’ve written a couple of posts before about Mickey Wright, first about her great Classic Golf Swing action and then a little more breaking down her setup and mechanics, but the legendary golfer really gives the Modern Golf Swing a firm condemnation in a long-awaited interview with Golf Digest (thanks to Peter A for passing it on).

I’m wondering how many of the greatest golfers ever have to to knock down the Modern Golf Swing, but they won’t be around forever – so it’s a good thing to get them on the record.

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Jack Nicklaus Destroys The Modern Swing – In 1974

USA team captain Jack Nicklaus(L) puts aThanks to KidCharlemagne for sending the quote from the book.

Jack Nicklaus is the greatest player of all time on the PGA Tour, although some would claim that title should go to Tiger Woods.

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Bubba Watson vs Jack Nicklaus

Bubba Address1I’ll be away all day today, at the Blue Jays’ charity golf event, but I’ve whipped up a post on what I saw yesterday while watching some of the Memorial in Ohio.

Bubba Watson blew a late-round lead to finish 3rd, but what caught my eye was a spot on his swing.

You all know (well, if you’ve been following the blog) that I view the classic swing mechanics from yesteryear as superior and much more mechanically-correct than the “modern” golf swing mechanics being taught today, from the stance to the pivot.

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Rigid Shoulders – Pivot Killer

It may seem counter intuitive but the more relaxed you are, the better you will swing.  Stiffness, especially in the upper back and shoulders, is  a pivot killer.

One of the more common things I see in the golf address stance is the stiffness.

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Remember – We Are Not Machines

There are things about us that make swinging different from a machine swinging.  We are not made of metal or wood, with rigid and inflexible parts that move with cables or hydraulics or magnetic fields.

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