Here’s Why MCS Is Optimal – Address vs Impact

If you want a simple pictorial illustration of why MCS is the optimal model for the golf swing, let me show you simply how it harnesses leverage over muscle power, creating the effortless-looking swing that you can create with it.

I’ve talked about the “dropping the hammer” concept and how it helps to set up the impact position at address, but when I took it a step further and worked with it a little to combine it with a previous method of setting up the address, something very cool occurred.

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Video Shoot Day 2 Complete – On To The Tutorial!

Video Shoot Day 2 is now in the books and after reviewing all of the video, I can now say that the initial portion of the “E = MCS” video production is completed, and I can now move on to the tutorial portion.

The weather has been doing its best to spoil the party but there was enough dry weather between the last days of rain and the current cloudy-rainy-thunderstormy stuff to get the job done.

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Something Missing In Modern Golf Swing Theory

The main difference between MCS and Modern Golf Swing theory, of course, is that the MCS swing theory has an over-riding principle when it comes the swing.

That principle is that a swing model must be mechanically-sound, or else it shouldn’t be used, let alone taught or encouraged.

That is an element sorely missing in Modern Golf Swing Theory, as coaches and players alike will freely admit many times that the model they use is harmful to the body.

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This Is Where Modern Swingers Get Stuck

If you’ve seen the jumping and twisting leading feet and legs of the modern golf swing players, you’ll know what I’m talking about here.

There is a tendency for swing analysts on TV, from what I’ve seen, to explain away mechanical flaws in the swing by declaring that the compensations or manipulations in the swing are responsible for power or speed.

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Time For A Wax Golf Face Lift (Updated)

Update below the break

If you notice any changes in the blog’s appearance in the coming days, don’t be alarmed – it isn’t going anywhere, and if you see some missing posts, that’s part of what’s going to be happening.

Simply, I’ve taken a look at everything here and think a change is in order – I’ve got over 1,400 posts written on this blog or posted from previous blogs, most of which I’ve taken down for now, as I decide what to keep and what to discard (which I don’t really – I put them back into “draft status” in case I want or need to revive them, and that keeps any comments on them still alive as well).

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I Tried The New Concept – And Broke My Driver… (Updated)

**Update At Bottom

I’m a little miffed about it as well, considering I just had it re-gripped a couple of weeks back, but that’s life.

I had gone to the range to see how close my established address position was to what it should be for an optimal impact, and the Welshman was there for a few moments before he had to depart on business.

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It Has Always Been About Position

It’s pure and simple, that the actual “secret” to a proper golf swing has always been in the address position, or the “Fundamentals Trifecta,” as I have called the Stance, Ball Position and Grip for years.

It’s the true formula, and while there have been many golfers in history who might have played brilliant golf with iffy stances, you’ve seen what I have laid out in recent years ago the historically best players and swingers have had strikingly similar stances.

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MCS Theory – Same Technique For Power & Speed

If you need any convincing that the technique for producing speed in the swing is the same for power, then have a look at two swings I have made recently with different drivers.

The swing on the left was with the Momentus Power Driver swing, so of course the technique for this swing would have to be one that provides power and leverage to move the much heavier club than a standard one.

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Quiet Swing = Gross Motor Over Fine

There is a problem with an “unquiet” swing, or one that uses a lot of little movements to perform the action.

I’m referring of course to compensations, the more of which you have, the harder it will be to make consistently good golf swings, especially under pressure.

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