How To Improve Your Swing After 3.5 Weeks Without Hitting Ball (Improved Pivot)

I had a hunch, I wrote a couple of weeks back, about something I had been looking at 12 years back with regards to the relationship between the back pivot and the down swing involving the concepts of “push” and “pull.”

Seems I was right on the money back then, and it took looking at Mike Dunaway’s “Peace River” video demonstration of his own back pivot concept to spur me to check it out once more.

I’ll show the top pivot position from nearly 4 weeks ago (PGA Championship Sunday), the last time I had hit a few balls, and I wasn’t happy with the amount of flex in my right leg at the top, beside the top position on Tuesday when I checked out the hunch:

Top Position DTL – May 19th vs June 12th


As you can see, I took a goo deal of the flex out, while not completely extending the right leg, and I might be able to do more, now that I am comfortable with the new concept I tried out and you can see the nice right leg extension below as well.


You don’t want to completely extend the supporting leg on the pivot, but keeping it flexed the way you hear to do it on TV is actually a hip-restricting move, because the more flexed the leg is, the less hip turn you will get out of the pivot.

Now, if you don’t think a low-trailing-heel gives you more leverage on the ground through impact, look at how low that right heel is and how much hip turn I have at impact – hips nearly facing the target!


I am still editing video but I’ll try to update this with some video on the actual swings, perhaps some gif.s as well.

So, as per the title, how did I implement this change in one session after not having hit a ball in 3.5 weeks?

The secret, really, is that hitting a million balls doesn’t really help you make a swing change. It just makes you a little better in your ball-striking with essentially the same swing.  To really make a swing change, you have to change your visual image or the “feel” of the part you’re trying to change.

More Like This… Mike Dunaway


I figured out what I needed to do and then I simply practiced the action with my SwingRite until it felt more or less natural.  Making a change in a day is virtually impossible, but making a change over one session is definitely possible if you’re doing something over the days between to ingrain the new feel and action.

Meanwhile, I’m now confident that what I was working is the proper way to go, so while the swings from Tuesday weren’t perfect, the next day swinging this way should yield even better results.

Dunaway DTL


I keep saying that my swing is more than “good enough” for playing purposes, but since I’m a swing researcher and analyst, I am just going to keep working on my swing to bring it closer and closer to what I see as the optimal action for the MCS Golf Swing model.

I’ve found that working on my swing to help others better understand the swing and to improve or change theirs is much more satisfying than simply working on it to go out and play casual rounds, which I enjoy as well.

Enjoy U.S. Open weekend, friends – more to come!


Back Pain or Back Injury Swinging a Golf Club?

Lacking Power, Speed, Distance and or Consistency? 

Need A Swing That Is More Easily Maintained?


If You Answered “Yes” To Any Of The Above Questions, The Answer Is In The Formula For The Golf Swing:

“E = MCS” The Swing Video

2 thoughts on “How To Improve Your Swing After 3.5 Weeks Without Hitting Ball (Improved Pivot)

  1. Mr. McJohn

    I find if I drop my trail foot from the line a bit, not only does it flare more, my trail leg is allowed to straighten more. I find a square stance hard to handle, simply because I feel like my hips have to fire hard, and my trail foot seems to rise early, whereas with a shut stance, the hips are quiet on the way through and active on the way back. I feel a square stance restricts turn a bit to be honest. Only thing I will say is that it’s only the feet that are closed. The shoulders are still on line.

    What do you think?

    Reply
    1. D Watts Post author

      I find if I drop my trail foot from the line a bit, not only does it flare more, my trail leg is allowed to straighten more…I feel a square stance restricts turn a bit to be honest. Only thing I will say is that it’s only the feet that are closed. The shoulders are still on line.

      That was part of the MCS standard model until two years ago, MMJ. I also advocated an angled stance line (with square shoulders always), the angle increasing the longer the club, just like Hogan did.

      I discovered two years ago however that the stance line has nothing to do with the pivot. It’s all in the setup. So from the “E = MCS” video and forward I’ve gone from an angled stance to square for all clubs, and I have no problem getting a full hips and shoulder turn – all in the setup and of course the mechanical action of the hips and legs.

      The angled stance in the MCS model therefore, while once standard, is now just an option. It’s neither correct nor incorrect in my view, and where I once used to unconsciously angle my stance line (and couldn’t not do it, however much I tried to stand square, I would invariably have an angled stance when I looked at Dtl video), I now unconsciously and automatically setup with a squared stance line!

      Snead and Hogan had angled stance lines, Jack Nicklaus did not. Looking at MCS, it more closely follows Nicklaus in stance and swing mechanics, but the hip & leg pivot action is all Hogan.

      Reply

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