I Proved That My “Tighter” Pivot Was Equal To/Greater Than… Now I Know How

It’s one thing to say, “a tight pivot will give you as much power or more than one that is less tight or looser,” and it’s another thing to actually prove it, as I did

It’s another kettle of fish altogether however to know why and how the tighter pivot is greater than a looser one, and the reason or mechanism was staring me right in the face!

I talked last year about how the 2nd Lever in the 3 Levers of the MCS Golf Swing had to do with the extension of the trailing arm in the elbow, providing the beginning of the “Pop” in the “Drop & Pop” action:


If you look at the trailing arm action from the “3 O’Clock” position above, down and through impact, it’s obvious that the elbow is extending the arm through to the “9 O’Clock” position, no one would argue other, correct?

And the motion is akin to this, if you isolated the trailing arm:


Now, there’s nothing new in any of this, if you’re a WAX Golf reader and MCS swinger – however, I’ve been thinking about the above points while swinging my SwingRite during this off-season.

I noticed that the better I got at making that tight pivot, essentially the “Big Legs, Little Arms” action, the more explosive my extension was into the bottom of the down swing.

From there, as I made the back pivots over and over, looking at everything in the motion from the leg and hip to the trailing arm action, it hit me:

Mike Dunaway Swings Down The Line


Mike Dunaway, of course, had a tight pivot, and this is how he was able to produce long-drive distance with what looked like a  regular golf swing and using regular-length shafts, instead of the long-shafted driver commonly used by long drivers today.

So, let’s look at another very long driver in his heyday, John Daly, who was so much longer than his peers in the 90’s that it was almost funny:

Long John Daly Goes After It


Hmmm….

I’d have to say, most people would call this a “far from tight” back swing pivot action, with that club shaft virtually pointing at the ground at the top, would you agree?

Well, believe it or not, according to what I’ve been working on, Daly’s back swing was just as “tight” as Dunaway’s, in the manner where it matters most, regardless of where the shaft is pointing at the top.


It’s the reason Daly was able to have a swing plane that was neutral, instead of way over the top, coming down from that extreme top position.

The secret is in knowing how the 2nd Lever works and how to maximize it, because the key factor in all of this is the Push vs Pull concept and…

Centrifugal Force


I actually tried swinging the SwingRite in the same manner as Daly above, and from what the feedback told me, it was no less leveraged than the very short and tight “Dunaway” type of back swing pivot and top position.

Interested yet?

More to come!


Back Pain or Back Injury Swinging a Golf Club?

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If You Answered “Yes” To Any Of The Above Questions, The Answer Is In The Formula For The Golf Swing:

“E = MCS” The Swing Video

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4 thoughts on “I Proved That My “Tighter” Pivot Was Equal To/Greater Than… Now I Know How

  1. D.L. Moriarty

    Dangit DJ, you definitely know how to get us interested and then hit us with the “tune in next week”!!
    The suspense is killing me!

    1. D Watts Post author

      LOL

      Happy Thanksgiving, D.L.!

      … you definitely know how to get us interested and then hit us with the “tune in next week”!! The suspense is killing me!

      I’m just trying to get people to think about what I’m doing and investigating with regards to mechanics. I have been “feeling” something looking at John Daly’s down swing for some time, and I’ve been trying to figure out how he is able to stay on plane with that high elbow and way-past-parallel shaft.

      I started getting a feel for the best top position for a right-handed dominant down swing, and working on the SwingRite got me there. Now, I look at Daly’s and Dunaway’s actions and say, “There it is…”

      I was correct that you do want a tight top position – the why of it and what “tight” is, are a whole different story! 😉

  2. D.L. Moriarty

    And a Happy Thanksgiving to you too!

    I think I know where you’re going with the tight position, but it could also surprise me. I can tell you that I feel more powerful keeping my arm in tighter and I use that Hogan wrist concept to change my shot shape a bit. Cant wait for the next revelation!

    1. D Watts Post author

      Excellent:

      I can tell you that I feel more powerful keeping my arm in tighter…

      I’ve just posted on that very thing, D.L. 🙂

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