Women’s MCS Golf Swings From Long Ago

I’ve been beating my figurative head against the wall for years, as you all know, trying to figure out why such athletic marvels as Michelle Wie and Tiger Woods are crippling themselves with the Modern Golf Swing madness, and you have to see this clip.

Thanks to Jim for posting it in the comments, and I know that many people don’t actually read comments sections (not a surprise with what you’ll find online in most comments sections), so I wanted to write an actual post on this.

We’ve all see the many great clips of swingers such as Jack Nicklaus, Bobby Jones, Ben Hogan, Tom Watson and the like, but they are men and, aside from Mickey Wright, I haven’t really featured many lady swingers.

If you’ll look at the following clip, you’ll see that this needed to be rectified forthwith:


That is some great action from several lady swingers from long ago, and if you compare it:

Silky…


To what today’s ladies, say, Michelle Wie:

Um…Not Silky…


It is truly tragic.

Now, I would have just one question to ask – does anyone really think that the classic swinging lady was any stronger or more athletic than Michelle Wie is?

The obvious answer is no, but look at the tortured swing by comparison of Wie to the comparison classic golf swing.

And that, my friends, is what has been lost since someone decided that they knew more about golf swing mechanics than Jack Nicklaus, Ben Hogan and Bobby Jones.

In short…

Disaster.


Back Pain or Back Injury Swinging a Golf Club?

Lacking Power, Speed, Distance and or Consistency? 

Need A Swing That Is More Easily Maintained?


If You Answered “Yes” To Any Of The Above Questions, The Answer Is In The Formula For The Golf Swing:

“E = MCS” The Swing Video

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11 thoughts on “Women’s MCS Golf Swings From Long Ago

  1. jh32

    DJ, something I noticed on the gif above of Mickey Wright is what I call the stall just before, during impact and then the move into the follow through? Wondering about your thoughts on this? Would this be like some have said the snap of the whip into impact?

    1. D Watts Post author

      I wrote a post about this a couple of years ago, which I had pulled, but I resurrected it for you, Jim.

      PS – If you perform the down swing properly, especially using the Kettle Bell “One Exercise” that I’ll be unveiling hopefully on Tuesday – should be a natural action, where the hips begin to slow and the arms pass, just like a cracking whip.

  2. jh32

    I remembered that you had done a stitch about Rory, but couldn’t remember when. thanks for the reminder.

  3. Chief Cowpie

    Along with your excellent study of Mickey Wright’s Swing, Babe Didrikson Zaharias deserves a look. She was said to be second only to Arnold Palmer as a fan favorite, To this day, she remains the only woman ever to make the cut at a PGA tour event. Her exploits, from Olympic gold medalist to basketball to golf are legendary. Cheers, Chief

    1. D Watts Post author

      Not a bad idea, Chief – now that the video project is coming to an end, I will give the Babe a look and share my thoughts.

  4. Mike Divot

    The Babe’s swing looks like a female Sam Snead. It’s that good.

    I can just hear the TV analysts now. “Her heel is raising off of the ground … she’s losing her connection to the ground forces … that’s a major power leak right there … look at that hip turn (wolf whistle)… that might be great at the beach but not on the golf course …. not exactly parallel at the top … she’s at least three and one half degrees off … that means she’s going to shank it … or maybe thin it … or hit it fat … or hook it … or take a mulligan. A lot of moving parts there and if she goes to a good instructor she might be playing off single figures in 10 years.”

    1. D Watts Post author

      Sadly, if you’ve seen modern analysis of swing regarding the great classic guys (one about Sam Snead came to mind – imagining giving swing criticism to the guy who won the most Tour events ever, was a multiple major winner, the longest in his era and won events into his 50s), you’re likely correct, MD.

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